GRC leak test

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a EasyTechJunkie researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

What is a Firewall Leak Test?

A firewall leak test is a procedure for identifying security holes in a firewall so they can be addressed. Firewall leaks primarily manifest in the form of unsecured outbound connections. Identifying leaks and addressing them will keep a network safer. Information technology staff can perform firewall leak testing with software or manually, depending on the network, their concerns, and the situation. They need to repeat the testing regularly to make sure the system is still safe.

Firewalls are primarily focused on keeping malicious materials out of a network. They block intrusions, limit incoming traffic, and may filter or scan material as it enters the network. The permissions on outgoing traffic tend to be more lax on the grounds that the primary concern is keeping material out of the network. Malicious software inside a system can exploit this to infect more computers and leak information, two potential security risks.

Leak Testing and its types

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A firewall leak test helps to determine if a firewall is vulnerable to online security threats like viruses and hacking.

Sometimes, people using the network create a firewall leak, usually without understanding what they are doing. They may use remote connection software to access a computer on the network from another location, or may load software and other materials from a memory stick or portable hard drive. Laptops can also create a firewall leak, as someone may pick up a virus while traveling outside the firewall and bring it back with them when they return to the network. A firewall leak test will highlight the leak and the source.

A firewall is often your first line of defense against outside attacks or malicious software.

In a firewall leak test, an operator or program checks the firewall for weak points. The goal is to see what kind of data can be passed along an outgoing connection and to identify the types of outgoing connections the firewall will allow people to create. This information is used to look for vulnerabilities in the network so they can be plugged. To make the firewall more effective, people can block some outgoing connections or filter outgoing data to snag confidential or malicious materials before they are released into the wild.

Information technology departments can perform a firewall leak test if they suspect a leak or as part of a routine system evaluation. Computer security requires an evolving approach, including random testing and analysis of the network to look for changes. Regular scanning of ingoing and outgoing traffic is necessary to identify anomalies indicative of leaks and other problems. A firewall leak test may also reveal a specific security risk, such as an outgoing connection set up to allow unauthorized personnel to access the system.

Mary McMahon

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a EasyTechJunkie researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a EasyTechJunkie researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

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GRC leak test

Computer Type: PC/Desktop
System Manufacturer/Model Number: had built
OS: 10 Pro retail 1909
CPU: Processor Intel(R) Core(TM) i5-8400 CPU @ 2.80GHz, 2808 Mhz, 6 Core(s), 6 Logical Processor(s)
Motherboard: BaseBoard Product TUF Z390-PLUS GAMING (WI-FI)
Memory: 8 GB
Graphics Card: Name NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti
Sound Card: Adapter Type GeForce GTX 1050 Ti, NVIDIA compatible
Hard Drives: Model Samsung SSD 860 EVO 500GB
Browser: Chrome
Antivirus: Defender
Other Info: MBAM

Windows 10
New 24 Oct 2016 #2

Holy mackerel! LeakTest hasn’t been updated since 2005 (I thought it was old, but I had no idea. ). I just downloaded and ran it with my Norton based machine (NIS 2016) and it failed, too. I’m not sure this is a legitimate concern, but it probably bears further research. It will be interesting to see what other members of the community have to say about this. At present, I’m not concerned, but maybe we’ll both learn something important here!
thanks for posting,
–Ed–

PS: One more lthing: you don’t want to run multiple firewalls on the same machine. If you end up using a different firewall, you’ll want to turn off the Windows Firewall if it remains active (most of the time when you install a different firewall, it will turn off the built-in firewall automatically).

Computer Type: PC/Desktop
System Manufacturer/Model Number: Homebrew
OS: Windows 10
CPU: i7 6700
Motherboard: Asrock Z170 Extreme7+
Memory: 32 GB DDR4 2133
Graphics Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1070
Sound Card: Asus Xonar DC
Monitor(s) Displays: 2xDell 2717 UltraSharp
Screen Resolution: 1980×1200
Keyboard: MS Comfort Curve 4000
Mouse: Logitech M325
PSU: Corsair 850 Platinum
Case: Rosewill BlackHawk Ultra
Cooling: Dynatron K985 Ball Cooler
Hard Drives: Primary: Samsung 500 GB NVMe 950 2xRAID Cards with 2X250 GB Samsung mSATA SSD Various other SSDs & HDs
Internet Speed: 890Up/45Down
Browser: All of ’em
Antivirus: Norton
Other Info: January 2016 build

Computer Type: PC/Desktop
System Manufacturer/Model Number: Homebrew
OS: Win10 Enterprise Insider Preview
CPU: i7-4770K
Motherboard: ASRock Z97 Killer
Memory: 32 GB DDR3 [PC3-10600]
Graphics Card: ASUS GeForce GTX 1070
Sound Card: onboard RealTek circuitry
Monitor(s) Displays: Dell 2717 27″ UltraSharp
Screen Resolution: 1920×1080
Keyboard: MS Comfort Curve 4000
Mouse: Logitech M325
PSU: Corsair Platinum 850
Case: Antec 902
Cooling: Corsair Closed-loop liquid cooler
Hard Drives: M.2 SATA SSD: Samsung MZVP512 Intel SATA 180 GB SSD Samsung Spinpoint 1.5 TB HD Toshiba HGST 3 TB HD JMicron RAID card w/2xSamsung EVO 840 250
Internet Speed: 890Up/45Down
Browser: All of ’em
Antivirus: Defender
Other Info: Test machine for Insider Previews